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Office for National Statistics reveals most common age of death

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has revealed new data on the common age of death based upon socio-economic positions. The 30 year study covers England and Wales.

In England and Wales for the period 2007 to 2011, the most common age at death was 85.6 years for men and 88.3 years for women, an increase of 8.2 years and 3.8 years respectively since 1982 to 1986.

The age at which half of the population is expected to be still alive had reached 81.8 years for males and 85.3 years for females; it stood at 74.7 years and 80.7 years respectively in 1982 to 1986.

Socio-economic data

In 2007 to 2011, the most common age at death for men and women classified to the higher managerial and professional occupations was 86.8 years and 89.4 years, which is 2.4 years and 2.7 years higher than men and women classified to the routine occupations.

Since the early to mid-1980s, the change in the most common age at death for men was much larger in the routine occupations compared with the higher managerial and professional occupations, ranging from 9.2 years (75.2 to 84.4 years) in the former and 7.4 years (79.4 to 86.8 years) in the latter.

Asim Butt, Health Analysis and Life Events, Office for National Statistics, said: “In England and Wales, deaths for men peaked at age 85 which is an increase of 8 years since the 1980s, while for women they peaked at age 88 and an increase of four years.

“These increases are important to consider for both pension provision now and in the long term and also for health and social care provision.”

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